skip to main contentskip to popular page linksskip to main navigation links
Office Hours Program Social Security Calculator Translate this page into another language
photo of Mike Capuano Michael E. Capuano representing the 7th district of Massachusetts in the U.S. House of Representatives Go to the House of Representatives homepage
Visit Mike's video channel on YouTube Like Mike on Facebook

 

 Mike's Schedule Voting Record District Maps Register To Vote FAQ Site Map e-Updates

Appropriation Requests for 2011

Listed below in alphabetical order you will find all of my fiscal year 2011 appropriations requests. Please note that these projects are just requests. Not all projects will be funded and those that are funded may receive less than requested. Every year during the annual appropriations process, Members of Congress have the opportunity to submit requests for initiatives that they believe are worthy of federal support. All Members of the House are required to certify they have no financial interest in the requests they submit for consideration. You can also download the list in PDF format. My submissions are listed below:


  1. AdMeTech Foundation ($4 million)

    4 Longfellow Place, Suite 3802
    Boston, MA 02114

    Project Description:

    The AdMeTech Foundation and its university/hospital partners discover and test non-invasive imaging methods critical for early detection and treatment of prostate cancer. These technologies will make it possible to shift prostate cancer care from surgical theaters and hospital wards to ambulatory clinics, with minimal discomfort, complications and costs. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because it will help extend work to improve early diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer using prostate imaging and image-guided, minimally-invasive approaches. Prior year funding of this imaging-related project has assisted, among others, researchers at Johns Hopkins University, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston University, the Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, and the University of Pennsylvania.


  2. ALS Therapy Development Institute ($4.8 million)

    215 First Street
    Cambridge, MA 02142

    Project Description:

    The ALS Therapy Development Institute is the world's largest ALS research center. Its therapeutic validation program has tested more drugs for efficacy than all world-wide labs combined. Several studies have concluded that veterans of the first Gulf War develop the fatal neurodegenerative disease known as ALS twice as frequently as the general population. ALS TDI has developed a fast track drug discovery and research program to identify risk factors, strategies for prevention, and development of therapeutic treatments. ALS TDI is requesting funding for equipment and continued support of its research program and to support clinical drug trials. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because of the potential to advance treatment for ALS, a deadly disease for which there is no known cure.


  3. Amyloid Treatment and Research Program ($407,000)

    Boston University School of Medicine
    72 East Concord Street, K503
    Boston, MA 02118

    Project Description:

    Funding is requested for equipment to support research and treatment of the rare disease group “systemic amyloidosis” at the Boston University School of Medicine and Boston Medical Center. “Systemic amyloidosis” includes both rare hereditary and acquired diseases in which proteins damage vital organs leading to organ failure and death. The equipment will greatly expand the capability to provide advanced research and improved treatment. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because the Boston Amyloid Program evaluates and treats patients from all over the country and provides consultation and diagnostic services for physicians all over the U.S. The research and treatment being undertaken will help lead to early detection and successful treatment.


  4. Associated Early Care and Education ($10.5 million)

    95 Berkeley Street, Suite 306
    Boston MA 02116

    Project Description:

    Funds are requested for the Child and Family Development Center in the Jamaica Plain Bromley-Heath public housing development. This Center will offer a one-stop child and family development center with early care and education, the coordination of health care and preventative care, and social services. Associated has delivered a comprehensive full-day, full-year program for children from birth to school in the Bromley Heath Housing Development since 1956. The Jamaica Plain Center offers programming for infants, toddlers and preschoolers. The new Center will increase current capacity. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because of the expanded programming it will provide to many families. It will also create 120 construction jobs and 40 long-term staffing jobs.


  5. Best Buddies Massachusetts ($10 million)

    45 Bromfield Street, 3rd Floor
    Boston, MA 02108

    Project Description:

    Best Buddies is requesting funding for its Empowerment for People with Intellectual Disabilities Project, a national initiative to empower people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) through social integration and meaningful employment. Best Buddies also seeks to raise public awareness of the need for and benefits of social inclusion. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because the project will help 18,750 individuals nationwide and impact many more by involving participants' families, peers, and teachers.


  6. The Boston Architectural College (BAC) ($250,000)

    320 Newbury St.
    Boston, MA 02115

    Project Description:

    Funds requested will allow the Boston Architectural College to acquire and offer training in additional software areas, such as GIS and energy modeling. These advanced teaching and learning tools will be accessed by approximately 1,100 students and 300 faculty members to teach and practice architecture and design. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because the equipment requested directly supports student job readiness and preparedness.


  7. Boston Chinatown Neighborhood Center ($252,000)

    885 Washington Street
    Boston, MA 02111-1415

    Project Description:

    The Boston Chinatown Neighborhood Center, Inc. is requesting funding to expand its Family Child Care program, which helps develop job skills for women interested in providing family child care services in their homes. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because the Center helps to train low and moderate income Asian American women in becoming successful licensed family child care providers.


  8. Boston Harbor Island Alliance ($2 million)

    408 Atlantic Ave, suite 228
    Boston MA 02110

    Project Description:

    Of the 34 islands that make up the Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area, none is more beautiful and more varied than Peddocks Island. It is home to historic Fort Andrews, an early Twentieth Century fort that was abandoned by the military in 1950 and is today in a state of significant disrepair. This project aims to restore and rehabilitate four buildings of Fort Andrews, stabilize eight others, demolish fourteen structures that are beyond repair, and undertake associated site work. The object is to make this area of Peddocks a vibrant, safe and heavily used signature park destination for Boston residents and tourists. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because it will provide both construction jobs in its initial phase and a boost to the local economy by dramatically improving the facilities on the island, drawing increased visitors. It will be a significant addition to the recreational park amenities available to residents and tourists.


  9. Boston Public Health Commission ($750,000)

    1010 Massachusetts Avenue
    Boston, MA 02118

    Project Description:

    The Homeless Services Bureau of the Boston Public Health Commission (BPHC) currently operates the Wyman Reentry Center for Men, a 25-bed program for men involved in the court system who are seeking a safe and sober environment upon release from court or incarceration and who are actively working on seeking permanent placement in job training, employment, transitional or permanent housing. Funding is requested so the BPHC can expand the successful Wyman Reentry Program to include a women's program for short-term transitional residential services for women. The program would provide case management, family reunification counseling, health, mental health and substance abuse services as well as job training, long term employment and housing referrals. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because, like their male counterparts, women who are incarcerated are more likely to have a history of drug and alcohol addiction, mental health issues, and suffer from chronic diseases. This program can help provide the resources they need to reunite with their children and achieve stable housing and employment.


  10. Boston University Photonics Center ($6.3 million)

    8 St. Mary's Street
    Boston MA 02215

    Project Description:

    This funding will help complete development of a set of fieldable prototypes based on the science of photonics that will enable soldiers to rapidly detect, diagnose, and treat emerging force protection and battlefield healthcare needs faster than any other devices currently available. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because weapons of mass destruction (chemical, biological, nuclear, and radiological) continue to present a significant challenge to national security. This request completes the development of another prototype to provide medical personnel with an ability to test for a wide range of viruses simultaneously and with confirmation to ensure a proper and early course of treatment which is essential for patient survival.


  11. Boys & Girls Clubs of Boston ($75,000)

    50 Congress Street, Suite 730
    Boston MA 02109

    Project Description:

    The Boys & Girls Clubs of Boston (BGCB) has requested funding for its out-of-school-time programs. In November of 2009 BGCB opened the Shared Space Club in the new Franklin Hill public housing development in Dorchester. Their nearby Blue Hill Club is filled to capacity. This program allows the BGCB to reach some of the area's most disadvantaged young people. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because the Franklin Hill Club operations will target families most in need of services by locating youth programs where they live. This is a cost-effective shared space model that could be replicated in communities across the nation.


  12. Brigham and Women's Hospital ($5 million)

    Division of Plastic Surgery, Department of Surgery
    75 Francis Street
    Boston, Massachusetts 02115

    Project Description:

    Brigham and Women's Hospital seeks funding for clinical and laboratory research in hand transplantation using composite tissue allotransplantation (CTA), an advanced approach in transplantation. The principal beneficiaries will be current and future amputees whose lives will be vastly improved through advances in hand transplantation. The project will also support the work of the world-class hand transplant team and transplantation biology laboratory at Brigham and Women's Hospital. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because its goal is to develop and improve hand transplantation as a method to replace amputated upper extremities.


  13. Cambridge Community Center ($2 million)

    5 Callender Street
    Cambridge, MA 02139

    Project Description:

    The Cambridge Community Center has requested funding to renovate their 81 year old facility, which serves low-income children and families in Cambridge, MA. The renovations will allow the Center to add infant/toddler care to their existing afterschool program, make the building completely handicapped-accessible and increase the amount of flexible meeting and activity space available to community groups. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because the Cambridge Community Center makes measurable improvements in the lives of children and families of Cambridge. Their after school and summer camp programs contribute directly to college and work readiness by providing young people with a wide range of academic support and enrichment activities. This project will also generate roughly 300 construction — related jobs over the course of 18 months, and will enable the Center to expand its service staff.


  14. Cambridge Redevelopment Authority (CRA) ($2.5 million)

    1 Cambridge Center
    Cambridge, MA 02142

    Project Description:

    Funds will be used by the Cambridge Redevelopment Authority (CRA) for the Gateway Project for the Longfellow Bridge Approach Corridor at Kendall Square. A variety of improvements are planned to create a city gateway that is fitting to this distinguished location that houses the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the Whitehead Institute, and the Broad Institute. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because of enhancements planned such as improved signage, pedestrian improvements and area-wide lighting, which will help enhance transportation.


  15. Cardiac Arrhythmia Syndromes Foundation ($380,000)

    300 Ballardvale Street, Ste. 201
    Andover, MA 01810

    Project Description:

    The Cardiac Arrhythmia Syndromes Foundation (CASF) is a non-profit organization dedicated to educating students and school personnel on the benefits of preparedness through CPR and AED training and prevention through early detection of heart abnormalities using electrocardiogram (ECG) heart screenings. The funding requested is for a proposed Good Neighbor Initiative which would involve the education and training components of CASF's SafeBeat prevention program in several Massachusetts school districts. It will be used for equipment, training and staffing. This project is an appropriate use of taxpayer dollars because the Good Neighbor Initiative will save the lives of young people with cardiac arrhythmia syndromes and other abnormalities that may otherwise go undetected.


  16. Center for Integration of Medicine and Innovative Technology ($25 million)

    165 Cambridge Street, Suite 702
    Boston, MA 02114

    Project Description:

    The Center for Integration of Medicine and Innovative Technology (CIMIT) is a consortium of 12 of Boston's premier hospitals and universities. Its focus is to accelerate improved care of wounded warriors by bringing together clinicians and engineers in collaborative teams for the rapid development and implementation of innovative technology and procedures. There are major challenges to bringing these life-saving technologies to the battlefield, acute care center, and rehabilitation setting. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because in the ten years since its founding, CIMIT has proven that connecting key individuals from diverse backgrounds to work on innovative technologies directed at critical clinical needs works extraordinarily well. It has methodically evaluated its past projects to measure “clinical impact” and has clear evidence of its success. A significant number of projects have reached the stage of clinical impact in a short period of time, improving care to the wounded.


  17. The Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, Inc. ($2.5 million)

    555 Technology Square
    Cambridge, MA 02139

    Project Description:

    To address the urgent need for groundbreaking research and development outcomes relating to the capture, sequestration and reconversion of carbon dioxide, Draper Lab and Brown University are jointly requesting funding for research and development of carbon reduction technologies. This innovative carbon dioxide science and technology initiative is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because it directly addresses the problem of greenhouse gases.


  18. Charlestown Nursery School ($100,000)

    124 Main Street
    Charlestown, MA 02129

    Project Description:

    Funding is requested for the establishment of the Reggio-Emilia Experiential Learning Center. The Charlestown Nursery School's curriculum is inspired by the Reggio-Emilia approach, where teachers and parents work together to create a curriculum that reflects the children's interests and pushes them to go beyond their initial understanding. Funding will be used for technology, educational materials and renovations. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because affordable quality childcare can be difficult to find and the Center will offer that.


  19. Chelsea Jewish Foundation's Leonard Florence Center for Living ($365,000)

    17 Lafayette Avenue
    Chelsea, MA 02150

    Project Description:

    The Foundation is requesting funds for a Center that will give elderly residents, including those with disabling conditions such as ALS, MS, and Parkinson's disease, individual mobility through automotive room controls and specialized transportation. This request will also support the Leonard Florence Center for Living's goal to expand programming nationwide. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because it will allow elderly residents with little or no mobility to live independently. In addition to assisting the elderly and those with disabling conditions such as ALS, MS, and Parkinson's disease, this project creates jobs throughout the community. The Center opening will create 100-120 new jobs including: nurses, physical therapists, nutritionists, housekeepers, maintenance workers, and technology assistants.


  20. Children's Hospital Boston ($1.5 million)

    300 Longwood Ave.
    Boston, MA 02115

    Project Description:

    Operation Iraqi Freedom has heightened the need for new therapies and advanced engineering technologies for the treatment of injured soldiers with severe trauma, as well as the monitoring of overall health and performance of military personnel. Devastating injuries caused by explosive mechanisms result in substantial bone and soft-tissue defects that are challenging to manage with current reconstructive techniques. With the requested support, Children's Hospital Boston proposes to continue research in Regenerative Medicine focused on the development and engineering of new medical therapies and advanced engineering technologies. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because it can lead to new regenerative medicine and advanced engineering technologies to prevent major organ damage, to repair and regenerate injured organs, and to monitor healing response to medication and medical interventions.


  21. Children's Hospital Boston ($750,000)

    300 Longwood Ave.
    Boston, MA 02115

    Project Description:

    The Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education conducted a 2009 statewide assessment of the priorities and unmet needs within schools in meeting the behavioral health needs of students. Children's Hospital Boston proposes to work together with partners from across the state to develop and implement a full scale assessment, training and professional development program for school personnel in Massachusetts designed to address the most pressing documented mental health needs. These include increased access to professional development; access to and protocols for referral to existing community resources; and family involvement. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because the program will support systemic improvements in our schools by building resource and mental health capacity, allowing more children to receive needed attention. Improved access to mental health services yields tremendous cost savings to the government, as children with untreated developmental and mental health disorders are more likely to be expelled or drop out of school, require special education programs, utilize more expensive treatment services and/or be involved in the juvenile justice system.


  22. City of Boston ($18.4 million)

    One City Hall Plaza
    Boston, MA 02201

    Boston University
    One Silber Way
    Boston, MA 02215

    Project Description:

    Funding is requested for Phase 2 of the Commonwealth Avenue Improvement Plan, for an improved streetscape that will significantly enhance overall pedestrian access and safety, include accommodations for cyclists, vehicular calming and safety measures as well as aesthetic elements. MBTA reservation areas located at some Green Line stops as well as bus shelters for the MBTA #57 bus route will also undergo improvements. Landings at the ends of MBTA Green Line Reservation Areas will be widened to provide larger pedestrian waiting areas thereby improving overall safety. An estimated 38,000 to 44,000 vehicles travel on this portion of Commonwealth Avenue on an average weekday making it one of the busiest arterials in Boston. In addition to vehicular traffic, the subject area contains the MBTA Green Line – B Branch. During the AM and PM peak periods, approximately 1,500 pedestrians per hour utilize the segment. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because the project will improve a major multimodal arterial of regional significance that will provide lasting transportation, safety and aesthetic benefits to the City of Boston, Town of Brookline and City of Cambridge.


  23. City of Boston ($2 million)

    1 City Hall Plaza, Suite 932
    Boston, MA 02108

    Project Description:

    Funding is requested for the Boston On-Road Bike Network, for design and installation of 43 miles of on-road bike accommodations. Design of on-road facilities will require traffic analysis, as well as engineering design. The Boston Bikes initiative is an integral component of the City of Boston's transportation, health, environment and economic initiatives. Boston currently has 29 miles of bike facilities and will add an additional 96 miles in order to create the complete bike facility network. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because of the many health, transportation and environmental benefits successful bike programs provide.


  24. City of Boston ($500,000)

    43 Hawkins Street
    Boston, MA 02114

    Project Description:

    Funds are requested for a re-entry program providing young adults age 18 to 30 with access to a range of green job opportunities. Services will include case management, remedial education, transitional job placement, job training in a range of green areas, and placement into unsubsidized employment. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because incarceration is extremely expensive, and a high percentage of those re-entering society end up back in prison, at great cost to the taxpayer. This program connects re-entering young adults to employment in the growing green economy.


  25. City of Boston ($1,785,712)

    Boston Fire Department
    115 Southampton Street
    Boston, MA 02118

    Project Description:

    Funding is requested to repair and stabilize approximately one quarter of the seawall on Moon Island, which is used by the City of Boston Fire Training Academy. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because a major storm could cause failure of the wall at key locations, compromising the use of the island for Fire Department training. Over the last 10 years, the Academy trained 562 Boston firefighters and 156 fire fighter recruits from 28 municipalities at the Moon Island facilities. Two other Special Operations Command Training Structures are planned for the facility, both of which will be used for regional training purposes.


  26. City of Boston ($3.356 million)

    Boston Transportation Department
    One City Hall Square
    Room 721
    Boston, MA 02201

    Project Description:

    Funding is requested for new traffic signals and upgrades to existing signals along heavily traveled City of Boston roadways. Some are proposed as a result of requests from the community and others will replace outdated traffic control equipment and vehicle/pedestrian displays to meet current standards. New traffic signal phasing and timing plans will be developed for all locations to allow for vehicles and pedestrians to traverse the intersections efficiently and safely. Some locations will feature vehicle detection and may be connected to the BTD central traffic computer system to allow remote monitoring and real time adjustments to traffic signal timing. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because new traffic signal phasing and timing plans will help manage traffic flow and enhance safety.


  27. City of Cambridge ($500,000)

    Cambridge Housing Authority Workforce program
    675 Massachusetts Ave
    Cambridge, MA 02139

    Project Description:

    Funding is requested to expand The Work Force youth development program from its current three sites, located in public housing developments and serving 135 low-income CHA youth annually, to include a fourth site at the local high school to serve an additional 45 CHA teens. The Work Force is a five-year-long program which provides after-school life skills classes, “try-out” mentored employment, and a variety of academic supports, including: monitoring of school attendance and performance; staffed, computer-equipped homework help centers; MCAS & SAT Prep classes; a Summer Literacy Camp and school-year literacy-building activities; college prep and admissions assistance; and scholarships for post-secondary education. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it helps young people to develop the skills and experience they need to join the social and economic mainstream, adding new taxpayers to the taxpayer pool and freeing up public housing units, a limited public resource, for other needy households.


  28. Community Boating Inc. ($2 million)

    21 David G. Mugar Way
    Boston, MA 02114

    Project Description:

    Funding is requested for the replacement of Community Boating docks. The docks are owned by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts' Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR) and serve as home to Community Boating Inc. Located on the Charles River, CBI is the nation's oldest and largest community sailing program. In partnership with the DCR, CBI operates youth sailing programs serving over 2400 children each summer, 300 high school students, and over 350 individuals with disabilities and their families. CBI is currently engaged in expanding youth outreach including competitive sailing programs for Boston Public Schools. CBI charges only $1 for these services. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because a sailboat is a microcosm containing all the physical and psychological stimuli utilized in the rehabilitative process. Some with disabilities have stated that no other therapeutic, recreational rehabilitation activity or sport offers the same or equal benefits as sailing does. Community Boating is working with a number of organizations to ensure that people with disabilities have the opportunity to sail in safety and experience adventure and freedom – building mobility, self confidence, and pride through achievement.


  29. Community Servings, Inc. ($195,959)

    18 Marbury Terrace
    Jamaica Plain, MA 02130

    Project Description:

    Community Servings is a not-for-profit food and nutrition program providing services throughout Massachusetts to individuals and families living with critical and chronic illnesses. They deliver a free, nutritionally tailored lunch, dinner, and snack to 725 people five days a week who are homebound with an acute, life-threatening illness. Community Servings requests funds for their Nutrition Program for the Critically Ill, Their Dependents and Caregivers Living in Massachusetts. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because of the important service provided to so many critically ill clients and their families. The nutrition program also provides an important financial benefit to taxpayers because the medically-tailored meals keep clients at home and healthier for longer periods, helping them avoid an accelerated decline that would require hospitalization or relocation to a long-term care facility.


  30. Converging Industries Research Foundation (CIRF) ($19.2 million over 3 years)

    64 Oxford Street, Suite 14
    Cambridge, MA 02138

    Project Description:

    Funds are requested for the Massachusetts Initiative for Real-Time Wireless Emergency Communications to provide real-time alerts to the entire population, let ordinary citizens communicate with one another when networks become overloaded, and provide first responders with an all-in-one handset. The Initiative provides a commercial service that can be used on a daily basis in addition to use in large-scale emergency events. Because it is built into the commercial network, Real-Time Emergency Wireless service is tested daily. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because full deployment of the Massachusetts Initiative for Real-Time Wireless Emergency Communications can lead to a more effective emergency communications system.


  31. Dana-Farber Cancer Institute ($1 million)

    44 Binney Street
    Boston, MA 02115

    Project Description:

    The Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI) is requesting funding for the Center for Personalized Cancer Therapy (CPCT), a joint program of the University of Massachusetts Boston (UMass Boston) and Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center (DF/HCC). It will be housed on the UMass Boston campus. The goal of the project is to establish a multi-faceted research, teaching, and scientific enterprise that will generate and utilize clinical and molecular information to help doctors optimize therapeutic treatments by tailoring them for a particular cancer patient. Using the personalized medicine paradigm, researchers will seek to understand how individual patients will respond to specific cancer therapies. The center will be integrated with the research activities and resources of the partner organizations. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because the goal of the Center for Personalized Cancer Therapy (CPCT) is to develop cancer tests that will achieve the level of specificity needed for a doctor to design a treatment plan that will have a higher chance of success for each patient.


  32. Dana-Farber Cancer Institute ($3 million)

    44 Binney Street
    Boston, MA 02115

    Project Description:

    Approximately six years ago, the cancer research community began unlocking the underlying genetic malfunctions that occur in cells causing melanoma. Although the melanoma research community is poised to make unprecedented strides in the understanding, prevention and treatment of melanoma, more research is needed to understand the unique biology of melanoma and develop effective treatments. These research efforts have been hindered by the fact that melanoma research is under-funded. Funding is requested to integrate basic and clinical investigative studies through four distinct research components, in order to develop improved cancer immunotherapies by focusing on melanoma as a disease model. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because melanoma accounts for 80% of all deaths from skin cancer, and can strike people of all ages, all races and both sexes.


  33. Department of Conservation and Recreation ($4.12 million)

    251 Causeway St. Suite 900
    Boston, MA 02114

    Project Description:

    The Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR) is requesting funding to repair the pier and renovate the administration building on George's Island for use as a visitors' center, construct new maintenance facilities, install a renewable energy system to power the island, and build a new ADA compliant pier. The pier on Georges Island, which is the main entrance to the island, is becoming increasingly unstable. The newly proposed float and ramp system meets new regulations for marine facilities and provides universal access consistent with the ADA. Without the pier, visitor access to the island and the experience of visiting cultural treasures like the Civil War-era Fort Warren would be eliminated. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because it will help preserve access to one of the area's historic treasures.


  34. Emerson College ($500,000)

    120 Boylston Street
    Boston, MA 02116-4624

    Project Description:

    The Colonial Building houses Boston's oldest performing hall, the Colonial Theatre, and now also houses nearly 400 Emerson students. The requested funding will help Emerson preserve the structural and architectural integrity of this historic property. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because Emerson's campus relocation to the Theatre District has been a major factor in the economic revival of a long-neglected area bordering the Boston Common.


  35. Emerson College ($500,000)

    120 Boylston Street
    Boston, MA 02116-4624

    Project Description:

    In January 2010, Emerson re-opened the long-neglected Paramount Theatre movie palace as a performing arts venue in the Washington Street Theater District, a National Register Historic District in downtown Boston. The requested funding will help Emerson install the equipment and technology for standard and high-definition video production of performances in this venue. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because of the economic and cultural impact of the Theatre on this part of Boston.


  36. Emmanuel College ($2 million)

    400 The Fenway
    Boston, MA 02115

    Project Description:

    Emmanuel College is committed to expanding its role in urban education and preparing K-12 students in math and science. The Center for Science Education is crucial to this goal. The center will utilize the extensive opportunities provided by the College's Academic Science Center, allowing Emmanuel to expand upon its success in implementing education outreach programs, preparing students for careers in science, and providing leadership in science education. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because establishing the Center for Science Education will expand and improve Emmanuel College's urban educational outreach programs in the Boston area while also providing opportunities for professional teacher development.


  37. Families United in Educational Leadership ($300,000)

    561 Boylston Street
    4th Floor
    Boston, MA 02116

    Project Description:

    Families United in Educational Leadership (FUEL) requests funds to expand its Inspiring Families of Low Income College Students, including expanding its Savings Circle to 300 families. Funding will also be utilized for additional staff to support students. FUEL uses a family-centered approach to help students become first generation college students. There is a strong correlation between students' greater academic success and parental involvement. The college savings program has four primary components: educational savings deposit where student savings are matched 1:1 by FUEL; the Savings Circle which helps participants learn savings strategies and gain financial literacy; the Savings Council which governs the distribution of allowable expenses by the savings funds. FUEL incentivizes saving, encourages community involvement in higher education decisions, and is the catalyst for a generation of first generation college students to attend college. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because it will help students save and prepare for college, giving them access to greater employment opportunities.


  38. Fisher College ($445,780)

    118 Beacon Street
    Boston, MA 02116

    Project Description:

    Fisher College launched College 101 in 2007 to give Boston Public School students college curriculum experience and exposure to the undergraduate environment. Its goal is to help urban high school students navigate the sometimes intimidating route to college, and to be prepared once they arrive. Through partnerships with Boston Public schools and local businesses, high school seniors will have the opportunity to spend a portion of their summer participating in an internship and taking a course at Fisher College customized to foster career readiness skills. Upon completion, students are invited to enroll in one college level course per semester at Fisher taken concurrently with their high school courses. This dual enrollment allows students to experience higher education and gain college credits while still in high school. As a result, they are more likely to pursue higher education. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because it focuses on preparing students for college, which will help them succeed once they are there.


  39. Forsyth Health Foundation ($2 million)

    140 The Fenway
    Boston, MA 02115

    Project Description:

    The Forsyth Center for Regenerative and Developmental Biology is dedicated to the advancement of basic biology and biomedicine, and to becoming a leader in basic, translational, and clinical research using biophysical mechanisms to regenerate and control the growth of human tissues. The Iraq war has compounded the need for research in this field; over 500 soldiers have lost limbs to roadside bombs and other improvised explosive devices. The Center's aim is to understand how cell behavior is normally orchestrated throughout embryonic development and adulthood, and then learn to control it to achieve the regeneration of tissues and organs as needed. A crucial component of this control system is bioelectrical. Indeed, proof-of-principle studies have demonstrated that the regenerative potential of tissues can be unlocked by manipulating their biophysical properties. This is an unprecedented opportunity to understand how bioelectrical signals can be used to induce or augment limb regeneration. Such tissues will ultimately be used for transplantation, or for regeneration directly in situ, in patients whose limbs need to be repaired after birth defects, accidental damage, cancer, or degeneration. Funding is requested for additional research and equipment. This is an appropriate of taxpayer funds because of the potential that the research has to improve treatment for those who have lost limbs.


  40. Fort Dupont Ice Hockey Club ($50,000)

    1328 Aspen Street, NW
    Washington, DC 20012

    Project Description:

    The Fort Dupont Ice Hockey Club (FDHC), located in Southeast DC, holds the distinction of being the oldest minority community-based ice hockey program in North America. As a result of the success of the Fort Dupont Hockey Club, more than 30 inner-city programs have been established across North America. The National Hockey League and USA Hockey have acknowledged and supported the efforts of FDHC. The funding requested will provide for the purchase of additional ice time, equipment, and opportunities to compete outside of the Washington area. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because it puts money into a proven, community-based organization, that has had a lasting impact on efforts to give DC's at-risk young people a viable alternative to the streets and potential juvenile delinquency.


  41. Franciscan Hospital for Children ($750,000)

    30 Warren Street
    Brighton, MA 02135
    (617) 254-3800

    Project Description:

    Franciscan Hospital for Children's Juvenile delinquency and early intervention program is a place for hope and healing for children in crisis. They offer expert crisis stabilization, assessment, and treatment. Funding is requested for the Hospital's programming, which offers high quality individualized care for youth ages three through nineteen, of all developmental abilities, and all diagnostic categories. The focus of treatment involves restoration of safety, targeting high risk behaviors, and reduction of suicidal behaviors. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because it will help Franciscan Hospital for Children provide early intervention services for at risk children.


  42. From the Top ($500,000)

    295 Huntington Avenue, Suite 201
    Boston, Massachusetts 02115

    Project Description:

    From the Top is a Boston based non-profit organization that celebrates the nation's outstanding young classical musicians. Through radio and television broadcasts, online media, and a national tour of live events and outreach programs, these performers inspire the pursuit of excellence, and encourage participation in the arts. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because From the Top's education and community outreach programs currently bring performers and education resources into classrooms, youth organizations, and arts programs across the country. Funding is requested for Massachusetts Makes Music. Aware of the barriers that can impede access to programs like these, From the Top also engages in efforts to target underserved populations and deliver customized "packages" of programs to meet their particular needs. Utilizing the power of peer role modeling, these programs inspire students to get engaged in music and the arts, and pursue excellence in other areas of their life.


  43. Girls Get Connected Collaborative ($364,553)

    Simmons College
    300 The Fenway
    Boston, MA 02115

    Project Description:

    Girls Get Connected prepares middle and high school girls for careers in science and technology. They offer summer and after-school programs for girls who live in Boston. This year, the organization is working with high school seniors on Saturdays to help them prepare for college. Given the research indicating that college women frequently start college interested in science careers but then change majors, each girl is matched with a mentor in her field of interest to work with her during her first year of college. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because it helps inspire young women to pursue careers in science and engineering. There are 5,024,000 working scientists and engineers in the United States. Of these scientists, 1,310,000 are women. Thus, women make up slightly more than one-quarter of the scientists and engineers in our country.


  44. Horizons for Homeless Children ($1.5 million)

    1705 Columbus Avenue
    Roxbury, MA 02119

    Project Description:

    Horizons for Homeless Children (HHC) is working to reduce developmental delays and improve school-readiness among young homeless children while providing parents with the tools for self-sufficiency. At HHC's three Community Children's Centers, 175 homeless children, from two months to five years of age, have access to high quality early care and education every day of the week. The requested federal assistance will assist HHC meet increased demand for these services by developing the capacity of its Community Children's Centers in the Boston-area. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because research has shown that homelessness during the early years of a child's life causes serious developmental delays that generally lead to the need for ongoing and expensive interventions if not addressed.


  45. Jewish Vocational Service ($300,000)

    29 Winter Street
    Boston, MA 02108

    Project Description:

    Funding is requested for Career Pathways for Frontline Healthcare Workers, an innovative partnership between the East Boston Neighborhood Health Center (EBNHC), Jewish Vocational Service (JVS), and Bunker Hill Community College (BHCC) to help EBNHC's entry-level workers move up the career ladder within the organization. JVS seeks to expand this project at EBNHC and replicate it within three additional Boston-area neighborhood health centers. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because this project will create jobs and new career opportunities for entry-level workers at a time when so many need employment and training opportunities.


  46. JFYNetWorks ($250,000)

    125 Tremont Street
    Boston, MA 02108-4713

    Project Description:

    JFYNet's Academic Support and Career Awareness initiative is a technology-based academic support program that helps middle and high school students learn math and science skills needed for the MCAS, and prepare for careers in environmental, clean energy and other industries. JFYNet has successfully contributed to and documented student achievement in Massachusetts schools for the past ten years. JFYNet is seeking funding for software, teacher training, professional development, classroom support and technical assistance to schools in the Eighth District focusing on the Lilla G. Frederick and Harbor middle schools in Dorchester. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because JFYNet Academic Support offers a proven means for schools to meet state and federal performance standards. Eight years of student performance data show that JFYNet students consistently out-perform their peers on the state assessment test.


  47. KidsPeace National Centers of North America, Inc. ($425,000)

    National Headquarters: 4085 Independence Drive
    Schnecksville, PA 18078

    Project Description:

    KidsPeace seeks funding to establish a therapeutic foster care program in the Boston area. It will provide community-based placement to children involved with or at risk for involvement with the juvenile justice system; address the mental health needs of children in the social service system; and provide safe and supportive homes to children. KidsPeace also plans to launch a new sub-site of its online counseling website, TeenCentral.net, to provide additional, web-based support for youth in this program, as well as foster youth and alumni across the country. It is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because for every dollar spent on therapeutic foster care, an estimated $14 is saved in court and corrections system costs. Therefore, a one-time investment of $425,000 can potentially save the federal government and the state of Massachusetts nearly $6 million.


  48. Lesley University ($5 million)

    29 Everett Street
    Cambridge, MA 02138

    Project Description:

    Lesley University is planning to relocate its art school, the Art Institute of Boston, to Porter Square, Cambridge. Although there are currently shops and dining establishments, the landscape is largely encompassed by numerous empty store fronts and a surface level parking lot. The Art Institute will provide much needed space for programs in photography, graphic design, fine arts and other specialties and will also enhance the cultural and economic vitality of the Square itself. The Art Institute of Boston has the capacity to infuse Porter Square with the spending power of 500 college students and 60 faculty and staff members on a daily basis. The Art Institute will enrich the area with its culture, character and a year-round program of art galleries, artist lectures, symposia and exhibitions. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because the completed Institute will have a direct impact on the economic and cultural vitality of Porter Square.


  49. Lesley University ($1.3 million)

    29 Everett Street
    Cambridge, MA 02138

    Project Description:

    Lesley University recently created The National Center for Teachers, Counselors and School Leaders to assist states, school districts and teachers across the United States prepare students for careers and college. The National Center formally launched in early 2010, offering educational resources and professional development for educators to address the achievement gap by teaching in high needs areas including literacy, mathematics, science, English Language Learning (ELL), and special education. The National Center serves as a web portal for those who work within the K-12 arena, offering professional development and access to resources that support educational efforts in high needs areas. Lesley faculty provides leadership in areas emphasizing access to learning, assessment of learning and effective use of resources. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because of the resources that will be made available to improve the educational experience for teachers and their students.


  50. MAB Community Services ($550,000)

    200 Ivy Street
    Brookline, MA 02446

    Project Description:

    MAB Community Services is the oldest social service agency in the country serving people who are blind or visually impaired. Today, MAB provides rehabilitation, educational, residential, and vocational services to individuals with a wide range of disabilities. In 1993, MAB founded The Ivy Street School in Brookline to fill a gap in rehabilitation and educational services for adolescents with brain injuries. Today, the school is one of only 3 in the nation with the expertise to focus on brain-injured individuals. Currently, one third of the students attending the Ivy Street School come from the 8th District. Students come to the school as a result of traumatic brain injuries (accidents or abuse), acquired brain injuries (stroke, tumors etc.), or congenital abnormalities. The school's more than 100-year-old building has extremely poor energy-efficiency and is in desperate need of renovation. This funding request would allow MAB to install energy-efficient windows and lighting; build a new energy-efficient and ADA-compliant transitional housing unit for brain-injured students (the on-site apartment will be students' first step to independent living, prior to moving to an off-site community residence); and upgrade its nearby Dummer Street residence to make it fully ADA-compliant. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because this “Green Building” at the Ivy Street School for Brain Injured Teens will improve the environment and create jobs (30+ short-term construction jobs), benefit the state's developmentally disabled and brain injured, and better prepare students for independent living in the community.


  51. Mass Mentoring Partnership ($360,000)

    105 Chauncy Street, Suite 300
    Boston, Massachusetts 02110

    Project Description:

    Mass Mentoring Partnership is seeking funding for its Mentoring Programs for At-Risk Children and Youth. Funding will be used to increase the number of mentors and expand existing mentoring program. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because research has shown that youth mentoring is an effective strategy for reducing delinquency and engagement in risky behaviors.


  52. Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority ($1.36 million)

    Office of the General Manager
    State Transportation Building
    10 Park Plaza
    Boston, MA 02176

    Project Description:

    Funding is requested for the Green Line Extension, for community level planning, land use analysis and conceptual design of a proposed extension of the MBTA Green Line from the Medford Hillside/College Avenue station to the Mystic Valley Parkway/Route 16 station at the Somerville/Medford border. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because the Green Line Extension is anticipated to generate 14,610 daily boardings associated with the 6 new subway stations that will be constructed between Mystic Avenue Parkway and the Brickbottom/Inner Belt station in Somerville. These additional daily transit trips will reduce traffic congestion. It will improve accessibility for commuters and promote economic development activity.


  53. Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority ($1 million)

    Office of the General Manager
    State Transportation Building
    10 Park Plaza
    Boston, MA 02176

    Project Description:

    Funding is requested for a new station on the existing Orange Line at Assembly Square in Somerville, between Sullivan Square Station in Charlestown and Wellington Station in Medford. The station will be an integral part of a major mixed-use redevelopment project which has been permitted for 2,100 residential units and 2.8-million square feet of commercial space. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because it will result in an improved transportation network, with access to living and employment opportunities.


  54. Massachusetts College of Art and Design ($500,000)

    621 Huntington Avenue
    Boston MA 02115

    Project Description:

    The Sandra and David Bakalar and Stephen D. Paine Galleries are MassArt's premier contemporary art galleries. Totaling over 10,000 square feet of exhibition space, they are the largest free contemporary art space in New England. The Galleries' youth art education program, Looking to Learn, was developed for Boston public school students and has been called a model program for children by museum educators. With over 500 students from Boston's public schools participating in Looking to Learn each year, this art education program has served more than 6000 urban students since it began in 1996. The Galleries need significant renovation. They have never been brought up to ADA-compliance codes and currently lack the most basic museum visitor amenities. They do not have climate-control, adequate lighting, an elevator, restrooms, dedicated education spaces, an orientation lobby, or even a visible front entrance. Funding is requested for this proposed renovation project. The renovation/expansion plan includes the addition of a new entrance pavilion and the excavation of neglected basement and crawl spaces to provide much needed community educational spaces, house administrative and other museum functions. In keeping with MassArt's commitment to environmental issues, the project will be designed and built according to LEED Silver certification standards. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because MassArt is the oldest public college of art in the United States and was the first college in the nation to grant a degree in art. An important facet of MassArt's public educational mission is to serve as an arts education resource for residents of Boston and the Commonwealth.


  55. Massachusetts College of Art and Design ($500,000)

    621 Huntington Avenue
    Boston MA 02115

    Project Description:

    Massachusetts College of Art and Design is planning to establish a state-of-the-art center for design and new media on its campus. The Center for Design and New Media will become home for the college's growing design and media programs, providing studio and classroom space for leading-edge practices and teaching methods in the areas of design (industrial, animation, graphic, fashion, illustration, architectural and website/interface design) and media (film, video, photography). Funding is requested for educational equipment to outfit the Center. Creative industries in general, and design fields in particular, are increasingly recognized as an important source of economic growth, innovation and competitiveness. MassArt is the region's leading educator of artists and professionals in the design disciplines. The new Center will provide appropriate flexible studio and teaching/learning spaces. Specialized spaces such as an industry-related product development lab, digital model shop, animation studios, and photography labs will be included. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because a robust design sector is important to the economic future of the state. During construction it is estimated that 40 full-time positions will be created in addition to employing 16 contractors during the 14 months of construction. The longer term contributions are much more significant. Since the majority of MassArt graduates continue to live and work within the Commonwealth, they will be a vital part of a skilled and innovative workforce that will help Massachusetts continue to be a leader in the creative economy.


  56. Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences ($750,000)

    179 Longwood Avenue
    Boston, MA. 02115

    Project Description:

    Funds are requested to expand programs in the Center for Drug Information and Natural Products (CDINP) and support instructional technology at the Boston Campus of Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences. The Center provides up to date, comprehensive and non-biased drug and natural product information to healthcare professionals and consumers. The CDINP also responds to a variety of requests concerning drugs and natural products, including foreign product identification, adverse reactions, safety of use during pregnancy and breast feeding, and the therapeutic use of conventional and natural products. Computer and instructional technology equipment will be purchased to expand the College's programs designed to address the national shortage of pharmacists, nurses, physician assistants, dental hygienists, radiologic technologists and other health care professionals. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because the Center is a national model for utilizing public and private sources to provide unbiased information on natural products and other complementary or alternative therapies. The Center also provides a model for training pharmacists and other health professionals to understand and to help address this important public health issue.


  57. Massachusetts Executive Office of Transportation ($5 million)

    10 Park Plaza, Suite 3170
    Boston, MA 02116

    Project Description:

    Funds are requested so that the Executive Office of Transportation (EOT) may purchase a ferry for use within the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority's commuter ferry system. An upgraded water transportation network will benefit commuters and tourists traveling between Boston, Quincy, the Harbor Islands, and other communities along the coast of Massachusetts. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because it will increase and enhance the opportunities for traveling through and around the harbor.


  58. Massachusetts League of Community Health Centers ($600,000)

    (in partnership with East Boston Neighborhood Health Center)
    40 Court Street, 10th Floor
    Boston, MA 02108

    Project Description:

    Given the growing shortage of primary care health professionals, the Massachusetts League of Community Health Centers (MLCHC) in partnership with the East Boston Neighborhood Health Center (EBNHC) is requesting funding to expand their respective healthcare workforce development initiatives focusing on clinical career tracks to nursing, medical assistant and other allied health roles as well as developing a pipeline of potential new leaders for the community health field. They will continue to work collaboratively to increase the number of highly-trained state residents who work in the healthcare field, providing clinical services as members of primary care teams. Existing employees of health centers statewide and in East Boston and residents seeking employment in East Boston will benefit from this project by having educational and workforce development opportunities available. Ultimately, health center patients throughout Massachusetts will benefit from better trained health center staff, better customer service and access to health care. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because CHCs are cost-effective health care providers, producing up to $24 billion in annual health system savings. They provide quality care that is equal to or greater than the quality of care provided elsewhere. Additionally, their overall economic impact now reaches $16 billion annually, and produces more than 150,000 jobs in the country's most economically deprived neighborhoods with 10,515 in Massachusetts and 6,170 in Boston.


  59. MetroLacrosse, Inc. ($1 million)

    150 Mt. Vernon Street
    Dorchester, MA 02125

    Project Description:

    Funding is requested for MetroLacrosse's National Capacity Building Program. Based in Massachusetts, MetroLacrosse features year-round sports-based youth development activities for urban youth and teens. By using the team sports environment to cultivate skills and values that lead to academic and personal success, MetroLacrosse is considered one of the most comprehensive sports-based youth development initiatives in the country. The National Capacity Building Program will allow MetroLacrosse to extend the impact of its high quality urban youth development programs to thousands of youth and teens across the country. MetroLacrosse's goal with a National Program is to establish a collaborative model that creates greater opportunity and access for urban youth and teens nationwide. Only 23% of urban youth participate in youth athletics compared with 62% of suburban youth. In addition to engaging youth in positive after school and summer programs, MetroLacrosse programs address the epidemic of childhood obesity. Over the past three decades, childhood obesity rates in America have tripled with nearly one third of children now overweight or obese. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because it teaches and promotes the value of physical activity for overall health.


  60. Milton S. Eisenhower Foundation ($600,000)

    1875 Connecticut Ave NW, Suite 410
    Washington DC 20009
    (Most funds will be subcontracted to the Dorchester Youth Collaborative in the 8th CD)

    Project Description:

    Funding is requested to expand the Foundation's Violence Reduction, Drop-Out Prevention and Youth Job Training program. In the 8th CD, the project replicates three proven models – the Boston Safe City Initiative/Gang Prevention model, the Eisenhower Foundation Quantum Opportunities high school drop out prevention model and the Argus Learning for Living job training and job placement model. The project's goals are to channel at-risk Dorchester youth into Quantum and Argus. Most funds will be directed to the Dorchester Youth Collaborative – which will partner locally with Catholic Charities, the Dorchester House Multi-Service Center and the Codman Square Health Center. The Milton S. Eisenhower Foundation will evaluate the replications, provide technical assistance and training, and administer the funds. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because it replicates three already proven models to reduce gang violence, reduce crime, reduce delinquency, improve grades, prevent many from dropping out, and provide job training and job placement for those who do drop out.


  61. Morgan Memorial Goodwill Industries ($1 million)

    1010 Harrison Avenue
    Boston, MA 02119

    Project Description:

    Funding is requested for repair and renovation of Goodwill's Roxbury headquarters. The project includes replacement of the leaking roof and failing HVAC units; upgrade of ventilation systems and insulation; and repair of 11 crumbling restrooms. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because each year 9,000 men, women and children from underserved Boston communities come to Goodwill for the training, career services and placement support they need to enter the workforce. This work is dependent on the effective operation of the headquarters building which contains a job training center and one-stop career center. Every year, hundreds of thousands of people in low income communities rely on The Goodwill Stores for low-cost, quality items. The headquarters also contains the Distribution Center for the stores as well as the largest Goodwill Store and Goodwill Outlet Store. The project is estimated to create 74 short term jobs, protect 296 current jobs and support the creation of 150 long term jobs over the next four years.


  62. Museum of Science, Boston ($500,000)

    National Center for Technological Literacy
    Science Park
    Boston, MA 02114-1099

    Project Description:

    The Museum of Science plans to develop a unique, interactive museum experience dedicated to exploring human life and advancing health literacy among differing populations. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because it focuses on Health Literacy, and the health disparities that are correlated with differing levels of health literacy. Similar to science literacy, health literacy refers to the basic concepts, language, and critical thinking skills necessary to take care of our own health and the health of our families. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because health literacy is correlated with longer lives, shorter hospitalizations, and fewer uses of emergency services. Nationally, nearly half of all adults have trouble understanding and using health related information. These funds will support greater education in this important national need.


  63. Museum of Science, Boston ($500,000)

    National Center for Technological Literacy
    Science Park
    Boston, MA 02114-1099

    Project Description:

    These funds will be used by the National Center for Technological Literacy (NCTL) at the Museum of Science to promote adoption of best practices in engineering education through established leadership and teacher training programs. Center goals include making sure all school districts in Massachusetts are prepared to address state standards in technology and engineering, teachers are prepared to deliver effective content in technology and engineering, students can successfully perform on technology and engineering related MCAS assessment items, and are exposed to career opportunities in technology and engineering. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because our economy demands a diverse technologically literate workforce and the Museum is well-positioned to help foster the next generation of scientists and engineers.


  64. Museum of Science, Boston ($250,000)

    National Center for Technological Literacy
    Science Park
    Boston, MA 02114-1099

    Project Description:

    This request will support increased access to Museum of Science programs by teachers and students from economically distressed communities. Funding will provide scholarship funds for STEM teacher professional development programs and student field trips, planetarium and traveling programs, courses, and camp-ins. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because an understanding of science and technology is essential to informed participation in the democratic process and to our economic well being as individuals and as a nation. Yet study after study shows the United States in danger of losing its worldwide preeminence in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.


  65. Museum of Science, Boston ($1.3 million)

    National Center for Technological Literacy
    Science Park
    Boston, MA 02114-1099

    Project Description:

    This project includes the development and installation of new exhibits, the creation of related programming, and concurrent media initiatives on the Engineering of Sustainability. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because creating a sustainable future is a great challenge for humanity. Through this initiative the Museum will introduce its visitors to the idea of sustainability; how to think critically about it; what scientists, engineers and everyday people are doing about it; and the choices facing us and our society. The exhibits will convey the view that by using scientific knowledge and the skills of engineering, humanity can design technologies and ways of living that will permit us to thrive while simultaneously supporting Earth's ability to sustain all life.


  66. National Braille Press ($1,003,567)

    88 St. Stephen Street
    Boston, MA 02115

    Project Description:

    To combat the low literacy rate among blind children today, National Braille Press (NBP) is creating an affordable electronic PDA (personal digital assistant) that will give blind students the ability to download textbooks, homework, take notes in class and participate actively along with their sighted peers in the classroom. The device will also give adults a vital tool to manage their work responsibilities that require email, internet access, and other digital communication. NBP is producing this device with the partnership of the APH (American Printing House for the Blind), NFB (National Federation of the Blind) and the AFB (American Foundation for the Blind) and the ACB (American Council for the Blind) to ensure that it is produced at the lowest cost possible for students and adults. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because Braille is literacy for blind people, and one can see the direct correlation with being Braille-literate and securing employment. This product will help blind students succeed in the classroom with Braille, and as an assistive technology device, help level the playing field for blind adults to compete and become productive members of the workforce.


  67. New England College of Optometry ($3.167 million)

    424 Beacon Street
    Boston, MA 02115

    Project Description:

    New England College of Optometry's Electronic Medical Record Curriculum Demonstration Project is a teaching system that integrates an electronic medical record (EMR) with a tablet-computer network to educate primary eye care optometry students. The system will incorporate real-time instructor oversight of academic and clinical information to improve health care education. This initiative could revolutionize health care education while reducing medical errors and administrative costs of training programs. The federal government's initiative to make electronic health records available to all citizens by 2014 is putting pressure on health care providers to convert from paper records to an EMR system within the next five years. It has been documented that this conversion carries the risk of additional errors. Current health care teaching programs have students use paper records during the first two academic years then convert to the EMR of their clinical-affiliate for patient care training. This project seeks to show that, by training health care providers using an EMR-based curriculum, both the inefficiency and the error rate associated with record-format conversion are reduced. A blueprint of this project will be offered for any medical training institution. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because facilitating the adoption of health IT helps advance the government's goals of improving health care quality, preventing errors, reducing health care costs and increasing administrative efficiencies.


  68. New England College of Optometry ($1.516 million)

    424 Beacon Street
    Boston, MA 02115

    Project Description:

    The New England College of Optometry seeks funding to evaluate the potential of using high-resolution images of the retinal cell mosaic as a marker for early diagnosis of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). This has become an increasingly frequent medical problem as the development of sophisticated body armor has improved the survival rate of combat troops injured by explosion. Most methods of TBI diagnosis rely on subjective testing and observation to determine the presence and extent of cognitive and motor deficits. Current brain imaging techniques do not have the level of resolution to identify tissue disruption that may be associated with subtle, yet life-altering, functional loss. The internal eye is mostly liquid, an ideal medium for transmitting shock waves to the posterior neural layers. Recent technical developments in aberration-correction have created the ability to view and analyze these ocular structures with previously unattainable levels of magnification and resolution. Adaptive Optics, which makes use of an electronic deformable lens (similar to that in the Hubble telescope) to instantaneously measure and correct high order optical aberrations, can be incorporated into several contemporary techniques of ocular imaging used to produce views of retinal structures. These enhanced medical devices are based on commercially-available, FDA-approved instruments that have a long and well-accepted clinical role in diagnosing and monitoring ocular conditions. The enhanced versions of these instruments have not been fully evaluated. In order to determine if these instruments can be used to correlate retinal cell disruption with TBI, the College proposes to compare the effectiveness of each device against each other on patients with previously diagnosed, shock-wave-induced TBI. The results will be disseminated to the scientific and medical communities, with the goal of developing a portable device for early diagnosis in field hospitals and to monitor the progression of the condition in response to neuro-protection or neuro-regeneration treatment strategies. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because the goal of this research is to develop techniques for early diagnosis of TBI in soldiers exposed to blast trauma, improving treatment and health outcomes.


  69. New England Great Waters ($60 million)

    Multi-state request

    Project Description:

    A number of public and non-profit organizations in the six New England states are working collaboratively to request $60 million in federal investment for coastal and freshwater ecosystem restoration, conservation and management. This funding will help address persistent and pressing environmental and economic issues throughout the six New England States that comprise EPA's Region One. New England is home to three of America's “Great Waters”, including Long Island Sound, Lake Champlain, and the greater Gulf of Maine (including the southern Cape Cod, Buzzards Bay, and Narragansett Bay). This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because all of these large bodies of water, and the watersheds that support them, have suffered severe degradation as a result of human impacts, and all are urgently in need of federal investment to reverse decades of decline and support future economic growth, development, and protection.


  70. Northeastern University ($4 million)

    360 Huntington Avenue
    Boston, MA 02115

    Project Description:

    The Northeastern University Center for Defense Sustainment will work with the Innovative Materials and Processing Team in the US Army Research Labs (ARL) to develop new materials for the sustainment of Department of Defense systems. NU will play a significant role in transitioning technologies into companies that will incorporate the technologies into deployable systems. In working with ARL, the Center will focus on several areas including novel manufacturing and repair technologies, advanced materials and alternative energy. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because the NU Center will accelerate the commercialization and transition of sustainment technologies that are developed as part of the Center program, and of other enabling information technologies required for implementing sustainment of systems operations. The Center will offer professional business mentoring and advisory support; access to private and public capital; and a network of business, financial, technology, and sustainment-application professionals, enabling entrepreneurs and businesses to accelerate the development and low-cost availability to the DOD dependable low-cost sustainment-based products, which have both military and civil applications.


  71. Northeastern University ($2 million)

    360 Huntington Avenue
    Boston, MA 02115

    Project Description:

    Northeastern University seeks funding to develop methodologies to quantify the effects of fatigue and dehydration on cognitive performance related to varied occupational conditions during normal routines. Triggers such as distractions and persistent discomfort during the performance of routine tasks will be identified and their effects on cognitive performance carefully examined. Particular emphasis will be on the measurement of effects on military mission critical decision making processes. Such individualized measures, in comparison with baselines at which cognitive functions become impaired, can be used to alert individual combatants or their superiors of a degrading cognitive functional state so that compromised individuals can be relieved from situations that require critical cognitive capabilities. This program will play an important role in guiding recruitment and assignment of new soldiers, as well as establishing training regimens to maximize the cognitive readiness of homeland defenders. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because the program seeks to develop methodologies to quantify the effect on cognitive processes of mild physical stress factors in routine mission environments, which can lead to decreased performance in critical decision making. It will lead to expertise and technology to meet the needs of the DOD in measuring cognitive performance. Areas of civilian impact exist, such as cognitive monitoring for the elderly at risk of dementia.


  72. Paul Revere Memorial Association/Paul Revere House ($400,000)

    19 North Square
    Boston, MA 02113

    Project Description:

    Lack of adequate space is a challenge for the Paul Revere House, limiting educational initiatives and administrative operations. One room provides space for both educational programming and administrative meetings, making it sometimes difficult to accommodate school groups. Collections are crowded in dispersed storage areas, and desk space for researchers limited. Space limitations are impacting the operation and have increased the wear and tear on the Paul Revere House and the Hichborn House. Visitors are unable to adequately explore the collections and archives. In 2007, the Association purchased 5/6 Lathrop Place, an abutting 1835 property to renovate as a much-needed Education and Visitor Center. Funding is sought for the renovations. This Center will result in program space for school groups and historic lectures; make the facility fully handicapped accessible; provide essential visitor amenities for the first time like restrooms and a water fountain. The new Center will also allow for the introduction of new technologies and programs. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because it helps to address critical preservation issues and reduce the wear and tear on two National Historic Landmark properties. Additionally, because of the iconic value of the Paul Revere House and the large volume of visitors over time, this effort is poised to yield enormous educational, cultural and economic benefit.


  73. Presentation School Foundation, Inc. ($1 million)

    PO Box 35834
    Boston, MA 02135

    Project Description:

    The Presentation School Foundation seeks funds to renovate the former Presentation School building in Brighton's Oak Square into a multi-tenant community center serving Allston-Brighton children and families. The center will provide educational, health and community services that strengthen Boston's diverse and fragile Allston-Brighton neighborhood. These services will include: a year-round affordable preschool (in partnership with Little Sprouts preschool, WGBH and Wheelock College); community health services (in partnership with St. Elizabeth's Medical Center); adult education and immigrant outreach programs. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because by providing financial support for the renovation of the former Presentation School building into a community center, additional programs and services will be available to the community. With a poverty rate of 23%, Allston-Brighton lacks both affordable childcare programs and programs for its rapidly expanding immigrant population. The establishment of a community center will help address this.


  74. Roca ($400,000)

    101 Park Street
    Chelsea, MA 02150

    Project Description:

    ROCA seeks funds for its High Risk Young Parent Intervention Project, which is designed to shift the life trajectories of one hundred (100) very high risk young parents through a cognitive intervention model that includes intensive transformational relationships, stage-based programming, and an engaged institutions strategy. This intervention is designed to not only improve the lives of young parents and their children but also to increase their skill levels, enabling them to live self-sufficiently and appropriately parent their childen. The funds will be used for staffing to engage young parents in a range of programming and evaluation. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because Roca serves high-risk young parents in communities where teen pregnancy rates are among the highest in the state; Chelsea's teen birth rate is nearly four times the state average. Teenage parents are unlikely to finish high school, experience higher rates of unemployment, and are likely to have second babies before they turn 21 (nearly 25% of young mothers have a repeat pregnancy by age 20).


  75. Roca ($500,000)

    101 Park Street
    Chelsea, MA 02150

    Project Description:

    In partnership with Chelsea High School, Roca is creating an innovative dropout prevention model for those most at risk of dropping out or being expelled. It will combine the implementation of Roca's High Risk Intervention Model with Chelsea High School's new 9th Grade Academy Model to intervene with young people identified as most at risk of dropping out, repeating, and/or being expelled. The project's primary goal is to keep them in school and move toward post secondary education and/or employment. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because High School drop outs have on average higher incarceration rates, increased joblessness, and earn far less over their lifetime than those who graduated from high school. The average high school dropout will cost taxpayers over $292,000 in lower tax revenues, higher cash and in-kind transfer costs, and imposed incarceration costs relative to an average high school graduate over their lifetime.


  76. Root Cause ($750,000)

    One Canal Park
    Cambridge, MA 02141

    Project Description:

    The City of Boston contracts and grants millions of dollars to hundreds of nonprofit organizations every year. Root Cause has formed a partnership with the City of Boston and is working to build Community Solution Portfolios to select and support a set of top-performing nonprofit and/or government programs that work together to combat childhood obesity in Boston. Funding is sought to continue this initiative. A wide range of community stakeholders and experts will be gathered to select a portfolio of organizations that provide the necessary elements of a successful intervention strategy to address obesity. Once the portfolio organizations are identified, Root Cause will work to build their capacity, facilitate collaboration and report back on progress and savings to taxpayers. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because it will foster better coordination between city departments and nonprofit organizations. This initiative will build off of the success of Root Cause's Social Innovation Forum in directing millions of dollars in philanthropic capital to selected high performing nonprofits. A similar effort to showcase the Boston Community Solutions Portfolio will further leverage taxpayer funds by attracting significant complementary investment from the private sector.


  77. Roxbury Community College ($4.3 million)

    1234 Columbus Avenue
    Roxbury Crossing, MA 02120

    Project Description:

    Roxbury Community College (RCC) seeks to establish the Massachusetts Biotechnology Educational Center. The fifth floor of RCC's Academic Building is under-utilized due to the condition of the existing greenhouse and the lack of adequate classroom space. The proposed renovation would broaden the College's curriculum to accommodate lab space for molecular biology, cell culture, biochemistry, green chemistry, environmental technologies, renewable energy certificates and retraining programs in order to make the biotechnology program and life sciences programs competitive for workforce development. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because individuals already employed in the biotech field require additional training to adapt to progressing industry technology. Recent graduates of RCC's biotechnology programs and life sciences would gain hands-on lab experience, making them competitive with college graduates coming from four-year learning institutions. RCC is located in the biotech hub of Massachusetts. The top biotechnology companies in the state are located within five miles of the College and accessible by public transportation.


  78. Schepens Eye Research Institute ($7 million)

    20 Staniford Street
    Boston, MA 02114

    Project Description:

    Schepens Eye Research Institute seeks funds for its Military Low Vision Research Program, which supports the development of new technologies to protect military personnel from blinding eye trauma, new treatments for eye injuries, and innovative methods to enhance visual performance in combat situations. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because currently, over 15% of battlefield injuries include the eye, and the result is often vision loss or blindness. Schepens Eye Research Institute is working with military ophthalmologists and optometrists, and researchers within the Department of Defense, to meet this important battlefield need. Battlefield eye injuries result largely from blast trauma and exposure to laser light. Research is focused on improving treatment of these injuries to save vision following battlefield injury, as well as developing vision enhancement devices. The Institute also brings significant expertise in the vision complications of neurovascular cerebral injury that may help military optometrists interpret some of the symptoms they see in troops returning home.


  79. South End Community Health Center ($425,000)

    1601 Washington Street
    Boston, MA 02118

    Project Description:

    The South End Community Health Center needs additional space to meet the increasing need for health care services for its growing homeless, low income and Latino patient populations, which are growing at the rate of 10% annually. Funding would be used for planning and architectural fees for a major renovation and expansion of the existing center. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because the expansion will enable the Center to increase its capacity by 20%, thereby increasing the number of patients from 15,000 to 18,000 and an increase in visits from 60,000 to 85,000, primarily to homeless, low income and Latino patients of the South End and Lower Roxbury neighborhoods.


  80. Tufts Medical Center, George Mason University, West Virginia University, Boston University, and Yale University ($10 million)

    650 Albany Street
    Boston, MA 02118

    Project Description:

    Federal funding is requested for the Consortium for Public Health and Medical Preparedness Disaster Planning. This Consortium works to enhance the nation's technical, systemic, behavioral, and organizational capabilities for public health and medical disaster preparation, response and recovery. The consortia will combine and coordinate their areas of expertise to investigate how and why specific public health and medical emergency preparedness protocols are developed; identify current threat and vulnerabilities; analyze and map strengths and weaknesses in public health and healthcare infrastructure and conduct real-world simulations and exercise drills. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because our current Public Health and Healthcare systems require scrutiny to ensure they are ready for the next disaster. As part of this federal funding, the Consortium will develop new, and refine existing, training and education to improve the effectiveness of responses to public health emergencies.


  81. Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University ($1 million)

    711 Washington Avenue
    Boston, MA 02111

    Project Description:

    This project seeks to strengthen the Neurocognition and Neuroscience program to prevent cognitive decline and dementia in elders utilizing the nutritional capabilities of the HNRCA. These funds will establish a cohort of Massachusetts and Northeast older adults at risk of developing cognitive impairment and dementia for a comprehensive nutritional intervention program to prevent cognitive decline and loss of independence. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because this multi-year preventive program, which should become a model for the nation, will build upon the extensive experience of the USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University in nutritional aspects of brain function and performance, as well as genetics and personalized nutrition. Achieving our goal could provide a basis for saving billions of dollars in health care funding, reduce lost productivity, and diminished quality of life for Americans.


  82. Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University ($1 million)

    711 Washington Avenue
    Boston, MA 02111

    Project Description:

    The Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging requests funds for continued research and operations. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because successful continuation of research could provide a basis for saving billions of dollars in health care, lost productivity, and diminished quality of life for older Americans through reduction of chronic and infectious diseases through proper and individualized nutrition.


  83. Tufts University ($750,000)

    Medford, MA 02155

    Project Description:

    Tufts University seeks funds to develop techniques in molecular regenerative medicine that will lead to new therapies for diseases and injuries of eyes, spinal cord, brain, and face. One of the biggest problems arising from the modern battlefield involves limb and craniofacial injuries caused by explosive devices. Civilians are also subject to these injuries through automobile accidents, cancer, and degenerative diseases. The cost to society is enormous, and currently-available “patch-up” therapies are neither sufficient nor economically viable as the mean age of the population continues to rise. Tufts' Center has pioneered an extremely powerful but still untapped system of cellular controls: natural bioelectric signals. Voltage gradients, electric fields, and ion flows present throughout the body are a crucial part of the language in which cells speak to each other to direct their growth and pattern formation. Neglect of these important morphogenetic signals has been partly responsible for the modest advances in biomedical regeneration to date. Tufts has developed novel techniques to detect and modulate these signals to control cell behavior during embryonic development, regeneration, and cancer. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because it will produce advances in basic science and help alleviate human suffering through development of therapies for enhanced healing of face, eye, brain, and spinal cord injuries. Such research has considerable potential to not only address healthcare concerns that together affect a huge number of the population, but also positively impacts the economy.


  84. WGBH ($350,000)

    1 Guest Street
    Brighton, MA 02135

    Project Description:

    WGBH seeks funding for its newest mission: LOOP, a multiplatform project to improve the environmental and scientific literacy of children ages 6-9 and their families. The centerpiece of the project, an animated PBS television series following the comedic adventures of five kids trapped in a video game, along with live-action videos, an immersive Web experience, and a grassroots outreach initiative will help children see the world in a new way and deepen their understanding of the systems and science underlying sustainability. WGBH believes that when children understand the science of how natural systems function and interact, they can then begin to learn how their personal actions affect its systems, and discover the ways they can contribute to a sustainable future. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because despite the recognized need for sustainability education, it is challenging to teach it in schools today. There is a paucity of curricular resources available for teachers and pre-service teacher training in this subject area exists only in a few model exceptions.


  85. Wheelock College ($1.5 million)

    200 The Riverway
    Boston, MA 02215

    Project Description:

    Wheelock College requests $1.5 million to develop a retraining initiative that provides high-quality education and skills development specifically designed to meet the needs of the fastest growing student population in Greater Boston: non-traditional adult learners, including: recently laid-off workers in diminishing industries, recent immigrants, alternative education/GED high school students, and other adults working in unskilled positions. In collaboration with the City of Boston, local workforce programs, community colleges and immigrant service providers, Wheelock proposes to develop a targeted, affordable, adult education and re-training program at its Boston campus. Wheelock will prepare adults for stable careers as educators, social workers, juvenile justice professionals, youth workers, community health workers, child life specialists, human service administrators, and non-profit leaders. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because even prior to the economic downturn, the need for adult education had skyrocketed. By funding retraining for adult learners, taxpayers are investing in the future economic vitality of their country—and helping their neighbors find new and better-paying careers at the same time. Wheelock will focus these retraining programs on its areas of expertise that are also high-growth career sectors.


  86. Wheelock College ($510,000)

    200 The Riverway
    Boston, MA 02215

    Project Description:

    Wheelock recently launched Phase I of the Early Childhood Higher Education Access Project, which involves the planning necessary to launch a pilot to improve access to a bachelor's degree for early childhood educators. Phase II will implement that plan with a specific focus on degree completion. Wheelock seeks funding for Phase II and will collaborate with the city of Boston, early education and care agencies, Bunker Hill and Roxbury Community Colleges to assist early childhood practitioners already working in the community earn a four-year bachelor's degree. The project will allow individuals to earn an Associate's degree from the partner community college and then transfer their undergraduate credits to Wheelock for the remaining two years. Wheelock will usher them toward degree completion by providing them with the appropriate support services, flexible scheduling, hybrid curriculum of online and face-to-face teaching, and tuition reduction in an adult-friend environment. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because America's future depends on the quality and competiveness of our workforce. Preparing the next generation for the challenges ahead begins by reducing the disparities in the knowledge and skills that children bring with them upon entry to the public school system. To make this happen, the educational level of early childhood teachers must be elevated to the bachelor's degree level. This project creates new job opportunities, raises the wage level of those already in the workforce, and improves the quality and competiveness of our students.


  87. Wheelock College ($900,000)

    200 The Riverway
    Boston, MA 02215

    Project Description:

    In the past year, Wheelock's Math-Science Education Initiative (MSEI) launched Math and Science Learning Teams. The learning teams pair Wheelock math and science faculty with local elementary and middle school teachers and out-of-school-time (OST) providers. The teams provide a range of curricular and training support to improve math and science teaching, elevate student engagement in math and science, and foster greater long-term interest in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) careers among students. Wheelock now seeks to deepen its support of elementary schools and OST programs by focusing on new in-roads for STEM teacher recruitment and new avenues for professional development. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because President Obama has stated his goal to increase the number of STEM teachers with the ultimate goal of increasing the number of students who pursue careers in these fields.


  88. Wheelock College ($600,000)

    200 The Riverway
    Boston, MA 02215

    Project Description:

    Wheelock requests funding for continued implementation of its Going Green project, which will involve replacing library windows, the roof of the Longwood Residence Hall, and the heating system and lighting in the theatre, which gets significant use by Wheelock, the Boston Public Schools and the community. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because it will help reduce the college's overall energy consumption in the heating and cooling seasons and its overall energy expenditures, and create 35 short-term construction jobs.


  89. Year Up Boston ($500,000)

    93 Summer Street
    Boston, MA 02110

    Project Description:

    Funds are requested for the expansion of Year Up's program in Boston. This will include programmatic support, curriculum development, and career placement services for urban young adults in Boston. Year Up is a one-year intensive education and job training program for urban young adults ages 18 to 24. Year Up's model combines marketable job skills, stipends, internships, college credit, and several levels of support to place these young adults on a viable path towards economic self-sufficiency. Students then apply their skills and gain a valuable professional experience during a six-month internship. Students select a learning track – in either Information Technology or Investment Operations – that will prepare them with the skills necessary for livable wage, entry-level work in these industries. Year Up's classroom-based curriculum was developed in collaboration with employer partners and Cambridge College. This ensures that students are gaining relevant skills that are needed in the workplace, with an academic rigor that prepares students for future postsecondary education. In addition to this valuable training, students earn up to 18 units of college credit from Cambridge College. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because of the investment in providing workforce development training needed to generate economic growth and activity in Boston.


  90. YWCA (joint request of $350,000)

    YWCA Boston
    140 Clarendon Street
    Boston, MA 02116

    YWCA Cambridge
    7 Temple Street
    Cambridge, MA 02139

    Project Description:

    YWCA Boston and YWCA Cambridge are jointly requesting funding to target growing at-risk youth populations in Boston, Cambridge and Somerville neighborhoods where youth violence and racially-motivated crimes are on the rise. The YWCA will utilize this funding to expand its professionally-facilitated, interracial community improvement program for disenfranchised neighborhoods, adult residents, young adults involved in the criminal justice system and law enforcement officials. The project's goals are to help reduce recidivism rates, youth violence and racially-motivated crimes, and increase residents' civic engagement. This is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because of the positive impact that the programming will have on young people and their communities.

 

Home | About | Biography | Contact | Issues | Links | News | Schedules | Services

E-Updates | Site Map | Privacy Policy | Accessibility

110 First Street
Cambridge, MA 02141
P: (617) 621-6208
F: (617) 621-8628
Hours

Roxbury Community College
Campus Library
Room 211
Boston
Hours

Stetson Hall
Room 124
6 South Main Street
Randolph
Hours

  Constituent Services Click to close menu
  Casework and Constituent Assistance
  Citizenship/Naturalization Information
  Immigration Casework
  Ordering Flags Flown Over The Capitol
  Presidential Greetings
  Tours
  U.S. Service Academy Nominations
  Internship Programs
  Washington, D.C. Attractions
  Grants and Federal Domestic Assistance
  FAQs
  News and Multimedia Center Click to close menu
  e-Updates
  Recent Votes
  Press Items
  Video and Audio
  Photo Gallery
  Legislative Issues Click to close menu
  Mike on the Issues
  Recent Votes
  Mike's Voting Record
  Scorecards for Mike's Votes in Congress
  Legislation Sponsored by Mike
  Earmark Requests
  Committees and Caucuses
  Ethics Task Force
  Congressional Schedules Click to close menu
  Mike's Schedule
  House Floor Summary
  Weekly House Schedule
  Annual House Calendar
  Weekly Senate Schedule
  About The 7th District Click to close menu
  Maps
  Cities
  Demographics
  The 7th District Over the Years
  Nobel Prize Winners
  Interesting facts about Massachusetts
  Massachusetts Links
  Links Click to close menu
  Massachusetts Links
    State Government
    About the 7th District
    Arts, Culture and Attractions
    Chambers of Commerce
    Colleges and Universities
    Exploring Massachusetts
    Hospitals and Health Organizations
    Newspapers
    Sports

  Federal Government Links
    USA.gov - Official Government Portal
    Legislative Branch
    Executive Branch
    Judicial Branch
    Federal Agencies
    Kids' Pages
    Register to Vote
    Washington, D.C. Attractions
    Business Opportunities with the Government

  Links For Students
 
  Contact Mike Click to close menu
  District Office
  Washington, D.C. Office
  Office Hours Program
  Community Meetings
  E-mail Mike's Office